Be Smart about Fire, Health and Safety!

Be Firewise!

 We can all help make the world a safer place by learning more about how and why fires start. NFPA offers dozens of consumer-friendly fact sheets on a wide range of timely and important topics - everything you need to know to keep you, your family, and your neighbors safe from fire and related hazards. 

Fire Adapted Communities

Communities that adapt to wildfire understand the risk and take individual and collective steps to prepare for wildfire. The actions in the larger community and in the landscapes surrounding them will reduce risk to public and firefighter safety, property, critical assets, the economy, and resources. An adapted community is more likely to successfully lower the negative impact of wildfire.

Community Risk Reduction

 It begins with a risk assessment for any given community. That risk assessment involves examining incident data to see what kind of events are popping up most frequently and where. Incident data can help us make informed decisions about deployment models, including how many stations, what type of equipment, and staffing levels to manage call loads. And for the record, deployment of emergency response resources is the backbone of a CRR plan. However, if we focus on emergency response exclusively, we're living up to the old adage: If the only tool in your kit is a hammer, then every problem looks like a nail. 

Do Your Home Materials Pose a Fire Risk?

Do Your Home Materials Pose a Fire Risk?

 Modern building materials work wonders for homeowners — they make homes easier and cheaper to build, they’re generally stronger and they take less time to construct.  But this convenience comes at a cost that homeowners need to be aware of: Increased fire devastation.

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The Ultimate Guide to Fire-Safe Landscaping

On average, more than 100,000 wildfires light up the landscape each year in the western portion of the United States. It’s not uncommon for fire to burn through more than two million acres across states like California, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, and throughout the West and Southwest.

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Fires & Other Natural Disasters

 According to Ready.gov, a fire can go from a hazard to life-threatening in a matter of minutes. If a fire starts while you’re asleep, you need to get out fast.   A full quarter of home fire deaths are caused by fires that started in the bedroom, according to the National Fire Protection Association:

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

The Ultimate Guide to Wildfire Safety

 It’s critically important to know a thing or two about wildfire safety. Why? First, 90 percent of all wildfires are started by humans, whether from arson, careless behavior, or lack of fire safety. Weather factors, such as lightning and drought conditions, also contribute to wildfires. According to National Geographic, more than 100,000 wildfires clear between four and five million acres of land in the U.S. each year – sometimes up to nine million acres in a single year.

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Prepare for Wildfire – Pack a To-Go Bag

 My colleague shared her experience when a wildfire was approaching her community several years ago.

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Disaster Preparedness for Pets

 Hurricanes, floods, wildfires, hazardous material spills—disasters can strike anytime, anywhere. If you think you will never have to evacuate unless you live in a flood plain, near an earthquake fault line or in a coastal area, you may be tragically mistaken. It is imperative that you make preparations to evacuate your family and your pets in any situation. In the event of a disaster, proper preparation will pay off with the safety of your family and pets.

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Tips for preventing wildfires

 “Fire safety in the field has two key components — prevention and preparation," says Jay Esperance, of the South Dakota Department of Agriculture Wildland Fire Division (SDWF). "Both are important and can mean the difference between disaster and controlling the situation for minimum of damage or work stoppage."

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Prevention, Protection, and Evacuation: Fire Safety for Farm and Livestock Owners

 Few homeowners can imagine the devastation that a wildfire could inflict on their property. For many people living in drought-inflicted California, they don’t need to use their imaginations — raging wildfires are a common and dangerous occurrence. However, you don’t have to live in California or next to a vast wilderness to be at risk for a fire, especially for those living in rural areas. Even urban farmers need to prepare their property, family, and livestock to minimize losses if disaster strikes.

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What YOU Can Do While Traveling to Wildfire Regions

 Planning vacations around wildfires. It’s officially a thing. If you’re from California or maybe Idaho, you’re used to fire as a part of life. Montana, Oregon and Washington are being hit particularly hard as well this year.  (Our thoughts and prayers are with you and all of the brave men and women fighting the blazes right now.) And we remember the headlines from last year about Gatlinburg, Tennessee.  There’s always a chance you’ll be in an area when a fire starts or had planned to pass through where fires are burning. This former firefighter tells you what you need to know to help and offers some wildfire safety tips to keep you and your family safe.

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MORE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Helping Children After a Wildfire: Tips for Parents and Teachers

 Natural disasters can be traumatic for children and youth. Experiencing a dangerous wildfire can be frightening even for adults, and the devastation to the familiar environment (i.e., home and community) can be long-lasting and distressing. Often an entire community is impacted, further undermining a child’s sense of security and normalcy. Wildfires present a variety of unique issues and coping challenges, including the need to relocate when home and/or community have been destroyed, the role of the family in lessening or exacerbating the trauma, emotional reactions, and coping techniques.

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How to Recover From a Wildfire:

 Introduction: What Homeowners and Restoration Professionals Need to Know  Recovering after a wildfire is a team effort and requires the help and expertise of many individuals. After the fire department and local law enforcement have given the all clear to return to the property, you are left to determine what to do after a wildfire to get your life back to normal.

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Health & Safety

Asbestos Exposure Risks

Asbestos Exposure Risks

Asbestos exposure has caused thousands of respiratory and abdominal injuries. Exposure to asbestos is the only known cause of mesothelioma cancer. Mesothelioma victims and their family members are entitled to compensation for injuries sustained from asbestos exposure.

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